About the 2004-2005 Report Card

About the 2005-2006 Report Card for K-12 Public Schools

This section provides answers to frequently asked questions concerning the 2005-2006 Report Card. The user should find answers regarding content of the Report Card, sources of data, definitions and rules for reporting, how data was disaggregated, etc.  Data is divided into seven sections: Accountability, Georgia Tests, National Tests, School Performance Indicators, Student and School Demographics, Personnel and Fiscal, and Comparisons. If you should have a question that is not answered here, please email the  Governor’s Office of Student Achievement or call 404-463-1150.

Content of Report Card:

Data Sources, Rules and Definitions:


Content of Report Card:

What is included in the “Accountability” section?

This section contains the Accountability Profile for either a school or a system that has been established by Georgia’s Single Statewide Accountability System (SSAS) in compliance with Georgia law and the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB).  Georgia’s SSAS is comprised of three components: Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), a Performance Index, and Performance Highlights. For more information about the SSAS, review the State Board of Education’s rules 160-7-1-.01, 160-7-1-.02, 160-7-1-.03, and 160-7-1-.04 at http://www.gadoe.org/pea_board.aspx?PageReg=PEABoardRules. In addition, this section includes information about Highly Qualified Teachers as defined by NCLB and the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.  Accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and by the Georgia Accrediting Commission (GAC) is presented for each school and summarized by system and state.   

What is included in the "Georgia Tests” section?

This section provides student performance results from Georgia tests based on the state’s Curriculum for the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) and the Quality Core Curriculum (QCC). The 2005-2006 Report Card includes results from the Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT), the Middle Grades Writing Assessment (MGWA), the Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT), the Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT), the End-of-Course Tests (EOCT) and the Georgia Alternative Assessment (GAA).

These test pages will open with a view of three-year trend data, but the user may select the icon and change the view to see the school compared to the district and state.
Compare Schools
These test pages will open with a view of three-year trend data, but the user may select the icon and change the view to see the school compared to the district and state.  The user can then switch back to the three-year view by double-clicking the icon. Three Year View

Special Note : GOSA reports the number of students participating on the GAA since it is individualized for each student. Students who take the GAA are not included in the results for the regular assessments on the Report Card as they are for Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). However, a description of the GAA instrument is included under the Georgia Tests: FAQ.

What is included in the "National Tests” section?

This section includes SAT, ACT, and Advanced Placement (AP) test results as well as the most recent test results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), SAT, ACT, and AP information is available at the school, the system, and the state levels. NAEP results are only available at the state level since the NAEP is sampled at the state level.

What is included in the "Indicators” section?

This section provides information on the following school performance indicators for the 2005-2006 school year: percentage of students taking the Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA), student attendance, school dropout rates, school graduation rates, exit credentials for high school completers, HOPE scholarship eligibility, and retained students.

What is included in the "Student and School Demographics” section?

This section of the Report Card includes fall and spring enrollment, fall enrollment by race/ethnicity, percentage of students with disabilities, percentage of students who are English Language Learners (ELL), percentage of economically disadvantaged students (based on whether student is eligible for the free or reduced-priced meal program, and percentage of migrant students.  In addition, this section contains enrollment in various programs such as the gifted program, vocational labs, alternative programs, the special education program, the English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program, the Early Intervention Program, and the Remedial Education Program.  To provide more background for schools and districts, county profiles with key socio-demographic variables are also reported.  To learn more about the specifics regarding these demographics,

What is included in the “Personnel and Fiscal” section?

This section has two parts. One section provides information on administrators, support personnel, and teachers.  The reports for certified personnel provide such data by personnel type as the number of positions, average annual salary, average number of contract days, average daily salary, number of full-time and part-time personnel, gender, race/ethnicity, certificate level, number of years experience, and average years of experience by each personnel type.  Fiscal data is only available at the system and state levels.  In the fiscal section, the data that is reported includes district revenues and expenditures for the fund categories of general, title programs, lottery K-12, and all other K-12, bonded debt, capital projects, and school nutrition.  A per-child cost to the system is included in the general fund.  GOSA also reports salaries and benefits as percentage of revenues and expenditures, millage rate, value of one mill per FTE, and value of one mill.

What is included in the "Comparisons" section?

The Comparisons section allows a user to compare up to 10 schools of the same level (elementary, middle, or high school) from 3 districts using selected criteria. The user selects the test or indicator to compare as well as the subject area (if applicable) and the student breakdown (demographics). This section also contains 2 additional tabs, “Download Other Data”, and “Related Links”.


Data Sources, Rules and Definitions:

What is meant by "All Students"?

"All Students" refers to all students who were tested in a grade level or to all students for which an indicator (i.e., graduation rate) is applicable. However, there is one exception to this rule. "All Students" on the Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) and the Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT) refers to all 11th-grade first-time test takers.

Why do I see "Too Few to Report"?

GOSA does not report on student groups with fewer than 10 students for reasons of confidentiality and statistical reliability.

What is meant by "No Data Available"?

"No Data Available" appears when a school or system has no data to report.

Why can’t I always get 100 when I sum percents?

Figures do not always add to 100 percent due to rounding. However, the sum of percents will always be either 99, 100, or 101.

Where does GOSA get its data?

A majority of the K-12 data is provided to GOSA by the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE). For the 2005-2006 school year, GaDOE analyzed the test results according to specifications provided by GOSA in order that the state Report Cards comply with both federal and state laws. Several other organizations and agencies provided information directly to GOSA or to GaDOE, and such data was used in this year’s Report Card: the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, the Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education, the Georgia Department of Labor, the Georgia Department of Human Resources, The College Board, the American College Testing Program, the Georgia Student Finance Commission, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the Georgia Migrant Education Agency, Department of Early Care and Learning - Bright From the Start, the Professional Standards Commission, and the Georgia Accrediting Commission.

What disaggregated data is included in the Report Card?

GOSA disaggregates data (when available) on the basis of race/ethnicity, gender, disability, poverty level, migrant and English proficiency. For the Georgia tests, student results are reported by fifteen (15) categories:

  • All Students
  • Asian/Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands.  This area includes, for example, China, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands, and Samoa.
  • Black – A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa and not of Hispanic origin.
  • Hispanic – A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.
  • Native American/Alaskan – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North America who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognitions.
  • White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East and who has no Hispanic origin.
  • Multiracial – A person having parents of different races.
  • Male
  • Female
  • Student with Disabilities –  A student or youth from three through 21 years of age is considered to have a disability under the IDEA if the student or youth meets one or more of the categories of eligibility consistent with State Board Rule 160-4-7-.02.  Categories of eligibility include: autism, deaf/blind, deaf/hard of hearing, emotional and behavioral disorder, mild intellectual disability, moderate intellectual disability, severe intellectual disability, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment, significant developmental delay, specific learning disability, speech-language impairment, traumatic brain injury, and visual impairment.  Such students are eligible to receive special education services.
  • Student Without Disabilities – A student who does not meet any category of eligibility to receive special education services.
  • Limited English Proficiency – A student who is an English Language Learner (ELL).  An ELL student usually has a primary language other than English.
  • Economically Disadvantaged – A student is eligible for free or reduced priced meal program.
  • Not Economically Disadvantaged – A student is not eligible for free or reduced meal program.
  • Migrant – A student who has been enrolled in the Migrant Education Program (MEP) for any time during the year. A child/youth is eligible to receive Migrant Education Program services if: 1) she/he is between 3 and 21 years of age; 2) parent, guardian, or other immediate family member is a migratory agricultural worker or fisher; and 3) moved within the past 36 months from one school district to another to enable the migrant worker to obtain temporary or seasonal employment in an agricultural or fishing activity.

These categories are used for reporting indicator data as well. For some test results (e.g., SAT and ACT), results by disability and limited English proficiency were not available, and race categories may differ slightly.

How is GOSA able to disaggregate student performance data and school-level indicators?

Beginning with the 2002-2003 Report Card, GOSA’s Report Card reflects the merging of Georgia test files with the Student Record for purposes of standardizing the identification of students by various group factors. The Student Record contains information on the race/ethnicity, gender, English proficiency, disability status, and migrant status on every student enrolled in a Georgia public school during any period of an academic year. Test results on years prior to 2002-2003 were based on the student self-reported coding on the test answer documents. Results on the SAT, ACT, and NAEP are reported by using the race/ethnic categories and other student demographic information from the actual answer documents, and therefore the student groupings may differ slightly.

How are students designated as "with disabilities"?

"Students with Disabilities" refers to those students who were coded with a state required code corresponding to a specific exceptionality or disability on the 2006 Student Record.  Categories of eligibility include: autism, deaf/blind, deaf/hard of hearing, emotional and behavioral disorder, mild intellectual disability, moderate intellectual disability, severe intellectual disability, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment, significant developmental delay, specific learning disability, speech-language impairment, traumatic brain injury, and visual impairment.  Students with disabilities are eligible to receive special education services via an Individualized Education Program (IEP).



ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION DETAILS: FAQ

What is AYP?

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is one of the cornerstones of the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). It is a measure of year-to-year student achievement on statewide assessments. Schools, school districts, and states must demonstrate a certain level of performance on reading and/or language arts and mathematics assessments.  The major components of AYP are (1) to show 95% Test Participation, (2) to meet Annual Measurable Objectives based on assessment results, and (3) to meet criteria for a Second Indicator.  Schools that do not demonstrate AYP for two consecutive years in the same subject area are designated as schools in Needs Improvement Status.  To learn more, visit the GaDOE website at http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/support/plan/nclb/ayp_faq.asp.

What is accreditation? 

Accreditation is a voluntary process by which schools seek a certification that they comply with the accrediting agencies educational standards or criteria.  There are two agencies that provide accreditation to Georgia schools.

  • The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) offers a process of accreditation to educational institutions in eleven southern states. SACS accreditation is a voluntary process of evaluation and application of educational standards or criteria. The SACS entity responsible for accreditation is called the Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS CASI).  Schools which have been formally accepted into the accreditation process for evaluation for the first time are noted as being candidates for accreditation.
  • The Georgia Accrediting Commission (GAC) has accredited Georgia schools that meet its standards since 1904. Schools must complete an application and submit to an on-site visit by a GAC consultant to obtain GAC accreditation, and must have a GAC consultant on-site visit every five years to maintain accreditation. The GAC recognizes four levels of accreditation: Preparation Status, Provisional Status, Accredited Status, and Accredited with Quality Status. Preparation Status is given to schools which have begun the process of applying the GAC standards and procedures. Provisional Status is given to schools which have begun applying GAC standards and procedures and have met standards in the areas of finances and administrator qualifications. Accreditation Status is given to schools which have met financial and administrator qualifications and have met at least 85% of the standards in each of the sections set by the GAC Board of Directors. A school is Accredited with Quality when it meets all of the standards which apply to Accreditation Status. The accreditation status of each school must be approved by the GAC Board of Directors.  

What is a highly qualified teacher?

As part of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), states are to implement plans for ensuring that students receive instruction from a highly qualified teacher.  The U. S. Department of Education defines Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT) and provides state requirements for HQT as follows:

  • Highly Qualified Teachers: To be deemed highly qualified, teachers must have: 1) a bachelor's degree, 2) full state certification or licensure, and 3) prove that they know each subject they teach.
  • State Requirements: NCLB requires states to 1) measure the extent to which all students have highly qualified teachers, particularly minority and disadvantaged students, 2) adopt goals and plans to ensure all teachers are highly qualified and, 3) publicly report plans and progress in meeting teacher quality goals.
  • Demonstration of Competency: Teachers (in middle and high school) must prove that they know the subject they teach with: 1) a major in the subject they teach, 2) credits equivalent to a major in the subject, 3) passage of a state-developed test, 4) High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE) that is for veteran teachers only – for more information see below, 5) an advanced certification from the state, or 6) a graduate degree.
  • High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE): NCLB allows states to develop an additional way for current teachers to demonstrate subject-matter competency and meet highly qualified teacher requirements. Proof may consist of a combination of teaching experience, professional development, and knowledge in the subject garnered over time in the profession.

In Georgia, the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GAPSC) has the full responsibility for the preparation, certification, and conduct of the certified, licensed, or permitted personnel employed in the public schools of the state of Georgia. Its mission is "to provide a qualified teacher in every classroom by setting and applying high standards for the preparation, certification, and continued licensing of Georgia public educators." To learn more about the GAPSC and teacher certification in Georgia, visit: http://www.gapsc.com 


GEORGIA TESTS SECTION: FAQ

What are the Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT)?

The Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT) are state-mandated end-of-year assessments. These tests are designed to measure how well students have mastered the content and skills that are unique to Georgia's Performance Standards (GPS) and to Georgia’s Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) in the areas of reading, English/language arts, and mathematics in grades 1 through 8 and in science and social studies in grades 3 through 8. The CRCT item format is selected-response. Based on performance, students are classified as:

For GPS based assessments:

  • Level 1 - scores below 800 - "Does Not Meet Standard;"
  • Level 2 - scores from 800 to 849 - "Meets Standard;"
  • Level 3 - scores at or above 850 (950 maximum) - "Exceeds Standard."

For QCC based assessments:

  • Level 1 - scores below 300 - "Does Not Meet Standard;"
  • Level 2 - scores from 300 to 349 - "Meets Standard;"
  • Level 3 - scores at or above 350 (450 maximum) - "Exceeds Standard."

What is the Middle Grades Writing Assessment (MGWA)?

In grade 8, the MGWA is administered in winter. Students demonstrate their writing ability by responding to a state-selected topic. Student papers are scored at the state level in accordance with scoring guidelines at one of three stages of mastery: Below Target (for scale scores from 300 to 348), On Target (for scale scores from 349 to 367), or Exceeding Target (for scale scores 368 to 400).

What are the Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT)?

Currently, the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) administers the GHSGT to evaluate student performance at the high school level. The tests include assessments in the areas of English/language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Current high school diploma requirements mandate that a student must achieve a passing score in each subtest of the GHSGT as well as on the Georgia High School Writing Test. If a student does not pass a subject’s test, then he/she is retested in that subject area. A student has multiple opportunities to take each subject’s test. The four core subject tests are scored Fail, Pass, and Pass Plus. The scale scores on the GHSGT range from 400 to 600; the cut-points for the levels of performance vary by subject. The following chart shows the scales and performance levels.

 

Scale Scores for the Performance Levels on GHSGT

 

Fail

Pass

Pass Plus

English Language Arts

400 to 499

500 to 537

538 to 600

Mathematics

400 to 499

500 to 534

535 to 600

Science

400 to 499

500 to 530

531 to 600

Social Studies

400 to 499

500 to 525

536 to 600

What is the Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT)?

Currently, the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) administers the GHSWT to evaluate a student’s writing performance at the high school level. Current high school diploma requirements mandate that a student must achieve a passing score on the GHSWT as well as on each subject area test of the Georgia High School Graduation Tests. If a student does not pass the writing test, then he/she is retested. A student has multiple opportunities to take each subject’s test. The writing test is scored as Fail (for scales scores between 400 and 499) or Pass (for scale scores of 500 to 600).

What are the End-of-Course Tests?

The A+ Education Reform Act of 2000, O.C.G.A. §20-2-281, mandates that the State Board of Education adopt end-of-course assessments in grades nine through twelve for core subjects to be determined by the State Board of Education. With educator input, and State Board approval, the End-of-Course Testing (EOCT) program is currently comprised of eight content area assessments:

  • English Language Arts
    • Ninth Grade Literature and Composition
    • American Literature and Composition
  • Mathematics
    • Algebra I
    • Geometry
  • Science
    • Biology
    • Physical Science
  • Social Studies
    • United States History
    • Economics/Business/Free Enterprise

The EOCT is administered three times each school year beginning with the fall of 2004. The EOCT will be administered during the fall/winter, spring, and summer of each year.

What is the Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA)?

The Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA) is to be used when the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team decides that a student should not participate in the state-mandated assessments even with maximum accommodations. The GAA assesses a student in Communication and seven other curriculum categories (Daily Living/Personal Management, Motor, Cognitive/Functional Academics, Social/Emotional, Community, Vocational, Recreation/Leisure). A student’s progress is assigned one of four scoring levels/ratings (initial, emerging, progressing, or functional) in each category assessed. The IEP team determines for each student which additional curriculum categories in addition to Domain 1 (Communication) will be assessed.

The GAA is not an alternate for the Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) or the Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT) in terms of satisfying the assessment requirements for a “regular” high-school diploma, but is an alternate for purposes of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). In order to ensure that all students are annually assessed as mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), students who were enrolled in eleventh-grade beginning with the 2004-2005 school year were to be assessed either by the GHSGT or the GAA for purposes of determining if schools, systems, and the state met the 95% test participation component of AYP.

How is GOSA able to disaggregate student performance data and school-level indicators?

Beginning with the 2002-2003 Report Card, GOSA’s Report Card reflects the merging of Georgia test files with the Student Record for purposes of standardizing the identification of students by various group factors. The Student Record contains information on the race/ethnicity, gender, English proficiency, disability status, free/reduced meal eligibility status, and migrant status on every student enrolled in a Georgia public school during any period of an academic year. Test results on years prior to 2002-2003 in previous Report Cards were based on the student self-reported coding on the test answer documents. Results on the SAT, ACT, and NAEP are reported by using the race/ethnic categories and other student demographic information from the actual answer documents, and therefore, the student groupings may differ slightly.

Why do academic performance results on the Report Card look different than those in the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) reports?

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) distinguishes between the requirements for AYP purposes and Report Cards. The differences in reporting occur because of the following:

  • Academic performance results for AYP only reflect the students that meet the definition of full-academic year (FAY) and for groups that meet the minimum size of 40 students or 10% of students in AYP grade levels, which ever is higher with a cap of 75 students. Report Cards reflect assessment results for all students that were tested and include results for groups that are comprised 10 or more students.
  • Academic performance results for AYP reflect only Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) in reading/English language arts and mathematics and the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT) in English and mathematics. Report Cards must reflect all subject areas tested (those mentioned previously plus science and social studies) on the CRCT and GHSGT as well as the Middle Grades Writing Assessment, and the Georgia High School Writing Assessment.
  • For purposes of AYP, results must be reported on 10 grouping factors: all students, 6 race/ethnic categories, students with disabilities, students with limited English proficiency, and economically disadvantaged students. For purposes of the Report Card, results must be reported on 15 grouping factors: the aforementioned student grouping factors plus male/female, students without disabilities, non-economically disadvantaged students, and migrant students.

Why do GOSA’s Report Card results on subgroups show a different number of students and sometimes different distribution of performance levels than previously released test-publisher reports?

As of the 2002-2003 academic year, the official source of student demographic information is the Department of Education’s Student Record. Test publishers rely on student self-report information on answer documents. GOSA’s process of reporting requires that the test documents be matched to the Student Record. When test records have erroneous or missing student identifiers, then no match can be made to the Student Record, and thus there is no available demographic information for that student and his/her test record. Demographic coding on test records often does not agree with the official student information in the Student Record. For this reason, the Student Record was mandated as the official source of student demographic information in May 2003 and has been used for reporting tests by grouping factors since the 2002-2003 Report Cards. Results on previous years are based on the student self-coding on test answer documents.

Why do the 2005-2006 Report results on the Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) look slightly different from summary reports for my school?

GHSGT test performances are reported on the 2005-2006 Report Card as three discrete categories: Fail, Pass, and Pass-Plus. This is slightly different from actual reports received by schools and systems in which the Pass and Pass-Plus categories were combined. This means that the sum of the three score categories will approximate 100 percent (+ or -1 due to rounding).


NATIONAL TESTS SECTION: FAQ

What is the SAT?

The SAT is a college admissions test developed by The College Board Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. The SAT has a verbal component, a math component and a writing component. Scores range from 200 to 800 on each section; when the three scores are combined for a total score, the range is from 600 to 2400. Many students take the SAT multiple times. The College Board releases SAT scores annually by reporting on the scores for seniors from their most recent administration. Some colleges, however, may take into consideration for college admission, a student’s highest verbal and highest math score regardless of the administration. GOSA presents SAT results in both ways. Only school, system, and state scores based on the most recent administration can be compared to the national scores. It should also be noted that the national scores released by The College Board include both private as well as public school students.

What is the ACT?

The ACT is a college admissions test developed by The American College Testing Program. The ACT results are based on student scores from their most recent administration so that they are comparable to the national averages released by The American College Testing Program. GOSA’s report includes the composite scores from the 2006 graduating seniors who took the ACT Assessment as sophomores, juniors, or seniors. An ACT composite score is a combination of the subtest scores in the areas of English, mathematics, reading, and science reasoning. Scores on the composites as well as each subtest range from 1 to 36. Disaggregated results for the ACT are only available at the state level.The school and system ACT data are for public schools in Georgia. The state results are for all Georgia schools, public and non-public.

What are the Advanced Placement Exams?

The Advanced Placement Program (AP) is a cooperative educational endeavor between secondary schools and colleges and universities.  The AP program offers students an opportunity to be exposed to challenging content at the college level.  Students by taking the AP exams can demonstrate their mastery of the course material.  Each AP exam is scored on a scale of 1 to 5.  A student who earns a score of 3, 4, or 5 is generally considered eligible to receive credit for the equivalent course at one of the colleges or universities that gives credit for AP exams.  There are 38 AP courses and exams offered across 19 subject areas.  The AP Program is sponsored by the College Board.  For more information on AP courses and exams, visit http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about.html

What is the NAEP?

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) assessments are administered to representative samples of students at the national and state levels for those states that want to participate. Georgia has participated in the NAEP reading assessments since 1992; in mathematics since 1990; in science since 1996; and in writing beginning in 2003.

The most recent NAEP results for Georgia are included in the 2005-2006 Report Card. The report includes:

  • 2003 and 2004 results on Reading in 4th and 8th grades
  • 2000 and 2004 results on Mathematics in 4th and 8th grades
  • 2005 results on Science in 4th and 8th grades
  • 2003 results on Writing in 4th and 8th grades

State and national comparisons for these tests are reported under the National Tests section for all students and for students by race/ethnicity and gender.

Why does GOSA present the SAT results by University System of Georgia (USG) institution type?

The graph entitled "Percent of High School Seniors Scoring At or Above the Average Total SAT Score of 1st-Time College Freshmen Entering Board of Regents Higher Education Institutions in the Fall" shows how seniors who took the SAT performed as compared to the average scores for college freshmen at the various types of University System of Georgia (USG) institutions.

For example, the state level summary for 2006 shows that 14% of the high school seniors in 2005-2006 across the state had a SAT score at or above the average SAT of 1223 for college freshmen entering Research Universities in fall 2006. USG institutions use multiple criteria including high school course selection, grade point average, and SAT/ACT scores for college admission. While the university system has set minimum SAT requirements, individual institutions may set higher admissions standards. The average SAT score by type of institution better represents the typical freshmen class at those colleges.

The average SAT score for college freshmen entering a sector can vary from one year to the next, but in most cases the average has increased. For example, the average SAT for freshmen at State Universities in Fall 2003 was 1010, in Fall 2004 the average was 1016, and in Fall 2005 the average was 1020.  

It should also be noted that these percentages are based on duplicated counts and should not be summed. For example, a student with a SAT score at or above the average (1223) for a Research University is also counted among those students scoring at or above the averages for the other types of institutions. SAT results for state colleges and two-year colleges are no longer being reported as the SAT/ACT scores are no longer required for admission to a state college and two-year college.

For more details on USG admission requirements, visit http://www.usg.edu.

What is the University System of Georgia (USG)?

The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia is the governing body of 34 institutions of higher learning. These 34 institutions are divided into 5 types: research universities, regional universities, state universities, state colleges, and two-year colleges. For more information about the Board of Regents and the University System of Georgia, access http://www.usg.edu.


School Performance Indicators: FAQ

How is the graduation rate calculated?

To comply with the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), Georgia has defined a graduate as a student who leaves high school with a Regular Diploma (this does not include Certificates of Attendance or Special Education Diplomas) in the standard time (i.e., 4 years). In prior years, Georgia has reported a completion rate that allowed the inclusion of students receiving a Certificate of Attendance or a Special Education Diploma. Because of the NCLB timeline for reporting information, graduation rate is calculated by using information in the relevant Student Records.

The actual graduation rate calculation is a proxy calculation; in other words, the lack of unique statewide student identifiers does not allow for tracking of individual students across the four high school years. The graduation rate reflects the percentage of students who entered ninth grade in a given year and were in the graduating class four years later. The 2005-2006 K-12 Report Card provides the 2004, 2005, and the 2006 graduation rates. A brief description of how the graduation rate for 2006 is calculated follows:

  1. Sum the 9th-grade dropouts in 2002-2003, the 10th-grade dropouts in 2003-2004, the 11th-grade dropouts in 2004-2005 and the 12th-grade dropouts in 2005-2006 for a four-year total of dropouts
  2. Divide the number of students receiving regular diplomas by the four-year total of dropouts plus the sum of students receiving Special Education Diplomas plus the number of students receiving Certificates of Attendance plus the number of students receiving regular diplomas.  The number of students displayed on the graphs represents an approximation to the students in the ninth-grade in 2002-2003 that should have graduated in 2006 and is the denominator in this step.  
  3. Change the result in step 2 from a decimal to a percentage (example: 0.83 equals 83%). The same process was followed for the 2005 rate except the years begin with 2002-2003 through 2003-2004 academic years and for the 2006 rate, the years begin with 2003-2004 through 2005-2006 academic years.

Graduation Rate Formula:

Numerator:                                            # of students who graduate with regular diplomas
Denominator:         # of dropouts in 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th from appropriate years + graduates + other completers

What is meant by high school completers, graduates, and exit credentials?

Completers are those students who exit from high school with some credential.  Some exit with regular diplomas and others exit with either a Special Education Diploma or a Certificate of Attendance. 

Graduates are a special group of completers.  Graduates are students who have met course and assessment criteria.  Graduates have completed a high-school program of study of a minimum of 22 units and have passed the four subject areas (English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies) of the Georgia High School Graduation Test and the Georgia High School Writing Test.  Graduates may earn one of several kinds of endorsements:

  • Diplomas with Both College Prep and Vocational Endorsements.   The table shows the number of students graduating in 2006 who have met the criteria of both the college preparatory program and vocational education program and who have passed the assessment requirements.  Formal seals of endorsements for both programs are affixed to the high school diplomas for these students. 
  • Diplomas with College Prep Endorsements.  The table shows the number of students graduating in 2006 who completed a program of study of 22 units in a college-preparatory program and who have passed the assessment requirements. A formal seal of endorsement is affixed to the high school diplomas for these students. 
  • Diplomas with Vocational Endorsements.  The table shows the number of students graduating in 2006 who completed a program of study of 22 units of which 4 must be in vocational education and who have passed the assessment requirements. A formal seal of endorsement is affixed to the high school diplomas for these students.

Other Completers include those students who exit high school with either a Special Education Diploma or a Certificate of Attendance

  • Special Education Diplomas.  The table shows the number of students with disabilities assigned to a special education program who have not met the state assessment requirements or who have not completed all of the requirements for a high school diploma, but who have nevertheless completed their Individualized Education Program (IEP) and graduated in 2006. The diplomas identify graduates as Students with Disabilities.   
  • Certificates of Attendance.   The table shows the number of students completing high school in 2006 who met all requirements for attendance and units but did not meet the standardized assessment criteria for a diploma. These students are awarded the Certificate of Attendance in place of the high school diploma. After leaving high school, students receiving the Certificates of Attendance are provided opportunities to retake the required assessments and, if they pass, are awarded the appropriate diploma.  

How is the dropout rate calculated?

To comply with the No Child Left Behind Act’s (NCLB) timeline for reporting information to the public, the process for identifying dropouts had to be adjusted to rely solely on the Student Record collection. The National Center for Education Statistics requires that states report a 7-12 grade dropout rate and a 9-12 grade dropout rate. Students are reported as dropouts if they leave school for one of the following reasons: Marriage, Expelled, Financial Hardship/Job, Incarcerated/Under Jurisdiction of Juvenile or Criminal Justice Authority, Low Grades/School Failure, Military, Adult Education/Postsecondary, Pregnant/Parent, Removed for Lack of Attendance, Serious Illness/Accident, and Unknown. The dropout rate calculation is the number of students with a withdrawal code corresponding to a dropout divided by the number of students that attended the school.  The number of students that attended the school is based on any student reported in the Student Record and excludes no-shows.

GOSA in response to the nationwide focus on high schools and its mission to increase school completion has made a reporting policy change.  Beginning with the 2005 Report Card, GOSA began reporting two dropout rates for those schools with grade configurations covering both 7-12 and 9-12 grade spans.  In the past, such schools had either a 7-12 dropout rate or a 9-12 dropout rate dependent upon the school’s grade configuration.  GOSA has recalculated both rates for 2004 and 2005 in order to provide stakeholders a trend line.  System and state level reports will continue to show both a 7-12 dropout rate and a 9-12 dropout rate.

How does GOSA report Hope Scholarship eligibility?

GOSA received the HOPE (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) Scholarship eligibility data from the Georgia Student Finance Commission.  GOSA reports the number and percent eligible for the HOPE at the school, system, and state levels.  The number of graduates eligible to receive HOPE Scholarships is reported by local school systems to the Georgia Student Finance Commission. Eligible students include those who graduated any time during the 2005-2006 school year as well as in the summer of 2006 while maintaining a “B” average during their high school program of study. Eligible students may use the HOPE scholarship to attend a postsecondary school in Georgia. The HOPE scholarship program is funded by the Georgia Lottery for Education. The percentage of graduates is computed using the number of reported eligible-for-HOPE graduates divided by the number of 2005-2006 graduates.


Student and School Demographics: FAQ

What is the data source for enrollment figures?

Enrollment graphs show both Fall and Spring counts for an academic year. The Georgia Department of Education collects enrollment counts from school systems periodically throughout the year. These collections are known as FTE (Full-Time Equivalency) counts. Fall enrollment figures are based on the October 2005 FTE count and the Spring enrollment figures are based on the March 2006 FTE count. The enrollment figure presented at the top of each page for a School, System, or the State reflects the October 2005 FTE.  Previous years’ information is based on the corresponding FTE counts.

What is the source of the percentage of economically disadvantaged students?

This percentage is calculated by dividing the number of students eligible to receive free- or reduced-priced meals (as reported to the Georgia Department of Education in October 2005 Nutrition Count) by the total school enrollment (as reported by the October 2005 FTE count). Previous years’ information is based on the October FTE collections from the corresponding years.

What is the data source for the percentage of students with disabilities?

The percentage of students with disabilities is based on the December 2005 FTE (Full-Time Equivalency) count divided by the total enrollment from the Fall 2005 FTE count. The December FTE has been declared the official count of students with disabilities (special education) since that data collection is used to determine federal funding.

What is the data source for the percentage of students with limited English proficiency?

The percentage of students with who are English Language Learners (ELL) is based on the 2006 Student Record. GOSA calculates this percentage from the count of students identified as ELL divided by the count of students identified at that school, system, or state anytime during the academic year according to the 2006 Student Record.

What is the data source for the percentage of migrant students?

The percentage of migrant students is based on the 2006 Student Record. GOSA calculates this percentage from the count of students identified as enrolled in the Migrant Education Program divided by the count of students identified at that school, system, or state anytime during the academic year according to the 2006 Student Record. 

Who is a retained student?

A retained student is one who is reported in the October 2005 FTE as being in the same grade for the 2005-2006 school year as he/she had been in the 2004-2005 school year.  The report shows number for each race/ethnicity category and for male/female.  The percent is based on the disaggregation group.

What is included under Community Data?

With the exception of the migrant education eligibility information, all community data are collected and reported at the system level only. Data reported for city school systems are the figures for the county in which the city system resides.  This data is provided to understand the community that a school system and its schools serve.  Community data includes the following data elements:

  • Children Eligible for Migrant Education: GOSA reports the number of children and youth in the Migrant Student Transfer System between September 1, 2005, and August 31, 2006, identified as eligible to receive services through the Migrant Education Program. A child/youth is eligible to receive Migrant Education Program services if: 1) she/he is between 3 and 21 years of age; 2) parent, guardian, or other immediate family member is a migratory agricultural worker or fisher; and 3) moved within the past 36 months from one school district to another to enable the migrant worker to obtain temporary or seasonal employment in an agricultural or fishing activity. The reported data also include 3- and 4-year olds, drop-outs, and students served by Georgia public schools only in the summer. The data were provided by the Georgia Migrant Education Program and reflect the number of individuals eligible to receive services through the Migrant Education Program, not the number migrant students actually receiving educational services by a specific school system. 
  • Number of Food Stamp Participants:  The purpose of the food stamp program is to assure that low income families have adequate and nutritious food. An eligible food stamp household must have a gross income less than approximately 130% of the federal poverty level and net income of less than approximately 100% of the federal poverty level. Countable resources of household members cannot exceed $2,000 (or $3,000 if the household includes an elderly or disabled member). Food stamp participants must meet citizenship and work requirements. The data are a yearly average of the number of families receiving benefits each month from July 2005 through June 2006. The data were collected and provided by the Georgia Department of Human Resources, Department of Family and Children Services. 
  • Number of Families Receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF):  The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program provides cash assistance for needy families with dependent children who are deprived of the support of one parent by reason of death, incapacity, absence, unemployment, or underemployment. When deprivation is based on unemployment or underemployment, one parent must have an established work history. The data are a yearly average of the number of families receiving aid each month from July 2005 through June 2006. TANF recipients are the most economically deprived with income substantially below the federal poverty level. The data were collected and provided by the Georgia Department of Human Resources, Department of Family and Children Services. 
  • Per Capita Income:  Per capita personal income is the annual total personal income of residents from all sources (e.g. wages/salaries, proprietors. income, rental, dividends, and interest) divided by the Census Bureau midyear estimates of resident population. The data are collected by the US Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. The data are available in May of each year but are two years behind. The data on the Report Card were released by the Commerce Department in May 2006 for the calendar year 2004.
  • Unemployment Rate:  The unemployment rate is defined as the number of unemployed persons divided by the total work force. The data on the Report Card are for the 2003 calendar year. Unemployed persons are those: 1) on a temporary layoff, 2) whose job ended involuntarily and began looking for work, 3) who terminated their job voluntarily and began looking for work, 4) who completed temporary assignments and began looking for work, 5) reentrants into the job market search, and 6) new entrants (those who never worked) entering the job market. The labor force comprises all persons 16 years old or older classified as employed or unemployed as previously described. The data were provided by the Georgia Department of Labor and represent a summation of monthly averages.
  • 2000 Population:  This represents the total population as reported by the 2000 U.S. census data collection. These data were provided by the U.S. Bureau of the Census from the 2000 Census of Population and Housing.  

What are Selected Programs?

This section of the Report Card shows data on programs in which that students may enroll.  The following briefly describes the various selected programs:

  • Gifted: The number of students enrolled in the Gifted Program, as reported by an unduplicated count of the October 2005 and March 2006 FTE. Gifted students meet state eligibility criteria for gifted education and receive special instruction and/or special ancillary services to achieve at levels commensurate with their identified abilities.
  • Vocational Labs: The number of students in grades 9-12 enrolled in vocational lab courses, as reported in the October 2005 FTE count. Vocational lab courses are state-approved and provide a laboratory component. The laboratory setting allows a significant portion of the instructional time to be spent in hands-on activities.
  • Alternative Programs: The number of students enrolled in an Alternative Program, as reported in the October 2005 FTE count. Alternative Programs are designed for a variety of students who may require an altered or modified educational environment. For example, Alternative Programs serve students who exhibit disruptive behaviors in the traditional school; students with “regular” status who choose to complete high school in a night school placement; or those whose academic progress may be furthered in a modified instructional program delivered in classes with smaller teacher-pupil ratios.

The Report Card reports selected program data as a number and as a percent of student population. The number of students enrolled in a selected program divided by the total number of students reported in the October 2005 FTE count as enrolled in the grades served by this program.

What are Compensatory Programs?

This section of the Report Card shows data on programs in which students receive special services that target areas of student needs. 

  • Special Education:The number of students enrolled in special education classes, as reported in the December 2005 FTE count. Special Education Programs are provided for identified eligible students with one or more disabilities, including intellectual disabilities, emotional/behavior disorders, specific learning disabilities, orthopedic impairments, speech/language impairments, visual impairments, significant developmental delay, and deaf/blind disabilities. The reporting of Special Education students is broken out by students in grades K-12 and students in pre-kindergarten.
  • English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL):The number of students enrolled in the state-funded ESOL program at least one 50-60 minute segment of the day as reported in the October 2005 FTE count. ESOL students are those students who, because their native language/home language/first language is other than English, have difficulty speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language. ESOL students do not possess sufficient English language skills to benefit fully from the regular classroom instruction.
  • Early Intervention Program (EIP):The number of students enrolled in the Early Intervention Program (EIP), at least one 50-60 minute segment of the day, as reported in the October 2005 FTE count. The EIP Program is designed to serve students in the early grades (K-5) that are at risk of not reaching or maintaining academic grade level. The purpose of the Early Intervention Program is to provide additional instructional resources to help students who are performing below grade level obtain the necessary academic skills to reach grade level performance in the shortest possible time.
  • Remedial Education Program:The number of students enrolled in the Remedial Education Program at least one 50-60 minute segment of the day, as reported in the October 2005 FTE count. The purpose of the Remedial Education Program is to assist students in grades 9-12 as they attempt to meet academic expectations of the Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) and Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) in reading, mathematics, and writing. Beginning 2006-2007, REP will include 6-12.
  • Title I:  On the Report Card, each school is designated as a Title I School-Wide Program or a Title I Targeted Assistance Program, or as not being served by a Title I program.  Title I is a part of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). This act provides federal funds through the Georgia Department of Education to local school districts and public schools with high numbers or percentages of poor children to help ensure that all children meet challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards. Title I is designed to support State and local school reform efforts tied to challenging State academic standards in order to reinforce and enhance efforts to improve teaching and learning for students. Title I programs must be based on effective means of improving student achievement and include strategies to support parental involvement. Local school districts target the Title I funds they receive to public schools with the highest percentages of children from low-income families. These funds may be used for children from preschool aged to high school.  In addition, local school districts are required to provide services for eligible private school students. These services must be developed in consultation with officials of the private schools.

The Report Card reports compensatory program data as a number and a percent of student population. The number of students enrolled in a compensatory program divided by the total number of students reported in the October 2005 FTE count as enrolled in the grades served by this program. For example, the Early Intervention Program serves only students in grades K-5. The percent of student population reports the percentage of students enrolled in EIP in grades K-5 compared to the total number of students in grades K-5 in the school.


PERSONNEL AND FISCAL SECTION: FAQ

What is reported for certified personnel?

Certified Personnel data are compiled from information reported by local school systems on the Certified/Classified Personnel Information (CPI) Report. The CPI is used to gather information regarding school system employees. The Report Card includes only those employees who hold a valid Georgia certificate.

For each category of personnel, the number of positions and the number of certified personnel are reported. The number of positions is reported as a decimal number designating the certified positions at that location, with partial numbers representing part-time positions, while the number of personnel is an actual head count of full-time and part-time certified employees.

For example, two full-time teachers and one teacher who works for half of the day is reported as 2.5 teacher positions and 3 certified personnel.

A full-time certified employee serving more than one school is counted as a part-time employee at the respective schools but as a full-time employee in the system-wide totals.

Years experience refers to the total number of approved years of service as an educator.


Category of Personnel

CPI Code Numbers

Title

Administrators

600

601-649

650

651

660

665

670, 671

672

673

675

680

System Superintendent

Administrative Supervisory Personnel

Director of Psychoeducational Program

Even Start Director

Director of Georgia Learning Resources System (GLRS)

Director of Child Serve

Vocational Director

Vocational Supervisor

Youth Apprenticeship Director

Adult Education Director/Coordinator

Athletics Director

Support

Personnel

300-305

400-414

415-433

434-437, 439 

438

440, 442-443, 445

441

444

446

447

448

449-450

451-468, 470-474, 486-499

469, 475

476

477-478

479

480

481

482-483

484

485

Special Education Personnel

Student Service Personnel

Information Service Personnel

Paraprofessionals/Teacher Aides

Rehabilitation Counselor

Librarians/Media Specialists

Teacher Support Specialist

Nursing Assistant

Enterprise Technician

Staff Development Specialist

Hearing Officer

Lunchroom Monitor

Other professional staff with valid certification

Special Education Specialists

Kindergarten Specialists

School Food Service Personnel

Diagnosticians

Speech-Language Pathologists

Audiologists

Physical/Occupational Therapists

Orientation/Mobility Specialists

Recreational Therapists

PK-12 Teachers

085-120

121

122

130

131-133

135

141, 158-171

142

144

145

146-148

149

150

151

153

154

155

156-157 

190

Regular Instructional Personnel

Crossroads Alternative School Teacher

In-School Suspension (ISS) Teacher

Instructional Specialists

EIP Teachers

Literacy Coach

Special Education Teacher

Related Vocational Instruction Personnel

ESOL Teacher

Hospital/Homebound Instruction Personnel

Gifted Instruction Personnel

Adapted Physical Education Teachers

Vocational Instruction Teachers

Young Farmer Teachers

Psycho-Educational Teachers

Night High School Teachers

Adult Education Teachers

Other Instructional Providers

Teacher Alternative Preparation Program

An itinerant teacher is a full-time certified employee serving more than one school is counted as a part-time employee at the respective schools but as a full-time employee in the system-wide totals.

Years experience refers to the total number of approved years of service as an educator.

Certified Staff Ratios are based on numbers of positions as defined above.

  • Teacher/Administrator Ratio is the number of teacher positions in a system for every one administrator position.
  • Teacher/Support Person Ratio is the number of teacher positions in a system for every one support personnel position.
  • Teacher/Staff Ratio is the number of teacher positions in a system for every one certified staff position (administrators and support personnel).
  • Student Enrollment/All Teachers Ratio is the number of students enrolled in a school system for every one teacher position, including instructional specialists, special education teachers and vocational instructional teachers, as well as regular classroom teachers.

Distribution of Certified Personnel by Category is displayed in a circle graph. These percentages are based on numbers of persons in each category.

What is reported for a district’s fiscal data?

The Data Collection Unit within the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) provided GOSA with the fiscal information for the school systems and for the state as a whole.  This information is based on several sources of data including the Georgia Superintendent’s Association and GaDOE Financial Review Unit.  The following explains the various fiscal data elements:

  • FTE Count: The FTE or full-time equivalent student count is a method of accounting for students for funding purposes. The FTE count for all students is taken two times every school year, in October and in March. An additional count for students enrolled in special education is taken in December. Two FTEs are reported on the fiscal page of the Report Card. One is the actual student count taken in October of each year. The other is a calculation of averaging FTE counts to determine the student count for use in allocating state Quality Basic Education (QBE) mid-term allotment funds to the system. Due to a change in the way FTEs are weighted for funding purposes because of House Bill 1187, these allotment FTEs are not comparable historically to the FTEs reported in the 1999-2000 or earlier GaDOE’s Report Cards. 
  • Millage Rate: The Boards of Education of most local school systems are authorized by Georgia law to levy taxes on the value of taxable property for the support and maintenance of education. (Some city school systems and one county system must have their millage rates approved by their municipal or county governing bodies, such as the City Council or County Commission.) The property tax levy cannot be greater than 20 mills unless a higher rate is authorized by a local referendum or granted by charter. This Report Card provides the 2006 school millage rate (used for tax collections in the fall of 2005 to fund the 2005-2006 school year).
  • Value of One Mill: Each mill levied raises 1/1000 of a dollar for each dollar of assessed taxable property valued in the area served by a local school system. The value of one mill is1/1000 of the net taxable assessed value of property in the school system. State law requires that most property be assessed at 40 percent of fair market value. (For qualifying property owners, the total assessed value is reduced by homestead or inventory exemptions.) To ensure comparability among school systems, the Millage Rate and Value of One Mill data have been adjusted in four cities that assess property at a different fraction of market value. The value of one mill has not been adjusted to reflect the fee charged by county governments for collection of school property taxes (usually 2.5%) or for property taxes due but not collected.
  • Value of One Mill per FTE:  This value depicts the amount that one property tax mill could raise for each FTE student in the school system in 2005-2006. The actual amount collected is usually reduced slightly due to delinquent or uncollected taxes and/or to collection fees charged by most County Commissions.
  • Revenues: Revenues depict the number of dollars received by a system from local, state, and federal sources to teach and support the children of the school system. The amount is determined by taking the total dollars received at the system level from local, state, and federal sources. To determine the amount spent per full-time equivalent (FTE), the revenues are divided by the system’s FY05 full-time equivalent (FTE) student counts used to allocate state Quality Basic Education (QBE) mid-term allotment funds to the system.

Explanation of Calculations of Revenues

 

Code

Type

Funds Included

100

General Funds

200

Debt Service Funds

300, 370

Capital Projects Funds

402

Title I

404

Education of Individuals with Disabilities Funds

406

Vocational Education – Federally Funded

414

Title II

408-412, 424-499

All Other Special Revenues

570

K-12 Lottery

516-559, 580-598

All Other K-12

600

School Food Service

Source of Funds

1000-1995

Total Local Revenues

3120-3200

Total State QBE Revenues

3300

Total State Lottery (K-12) Revenues

3510, 3600, 3800, 3995

Total State Other Program Revenues

4300-4900

Total Federal Revenues

5100, 5300, 5995

Total Other Revenues


  • Expenditures: GOSA reports the number of dollars spent to teach and support the children in the school system. The amount is determined by taking the total dollars expended at the system level. To determine the amount spent per full-time equivalent (FTE), the expenditures are divided by the system’s FY05 full-time equivalent (FTE) student counts used to allocate state Quality Basic Education (QBE) mid-term allotment funds to the system. The total dollars expended are split into the following fund accounts: general fund, title programs, lottery K-12 and all other K-12, bonded debt, capital projects, and school nutrition. Each fund is subdivided into the following expenditure areas: instruction, media, instructional support, pupil services, general administration, school administration, transportation, maintenance and operations, renovations and capital projects, school food services, and debt service.

Explanation of Calculations of Expenditures

 

Code

Type

Funds

Included

100

General Funds

200

Debt Service Funds

300, 370

Capital Projects Funds

370

Capital Outlay – Exceptional Growth

402

Title I

404

Education of Individuals with Disabilities Funds

406

Vocational Education – Federally Funded

414

Title II

408-412, 424-499

All Other Special Revenues

570

K-12 Lottery

516-559, 580-598

All Other K-12

600

School Food Service

 

Area

Function

Expenditure Area

Instruction

1000 Instruction

Media

2220 Educational Media Services

Instructional Support

2210 Improvement of Instructional Services

2800 Central Services

2900 Other Support Services

Pupil Services

2100 Pupil Services

General Administration

2300 General Administration

2500 Business Services

School Administration

2400 School Administration

Transportation

2700 Student Transportation Services

Maintenance & Operations

2600 Maintenance & Operations of Plant Services

Renovations & Capital Projects

4000 Facilities Acquisition & Construction Services

School Food Services

3100 School Food Services

Debt Service

5100 Debt Service


  • Salaries and Benefits as Percentages of Revenues and of Expenditures: GOSA reports the dollar amount spent on salaries and benefits for teachers and paraprofessionals providing direct instruction, for administrative staff in the schools and for system-level administrative staff. The amount is determined by taking the total dollars expended at the system level.

Explanation of Calculations of Salaries and Benefits

 

Code

Type

Funds Included

100

General Funds

200

Debt Service Funds

300, 370

Capital Projects Funds

402

Title I

404

Education of Individuals with Disabilities Funds

406

Vocational Education – Federally Funded

414

Title II

408-412, 424-499

All Other Special Revenues

570

K-12 Lottery

516-559, 580-598

All Other K-12

600

School Food Service

Teacher & Paraprofessional Salaries & Benefits

Functions

Objects

1000 Instruction

110 Teachers

115 Extended Day

117 Extended Year

140 Aides and Paraprofessionals

142 Clerical

191 Other Administrative Personnel

200 Employee Benefits

School Administration Salaries & Benefits

2400 School Administration

190 Other Management Personnel

191 Other Administrative Personnel

200 Employee Benefits

General Administration Salaries & Benefits

2300 General Administration

120 Superintendent

121 Deputy, Associate, Assistant, Area   

Superintendent

190 Other Management Personnel

191 Other Administrative Personnel

200 Employee Benefits

2500 Business Services

190 Other Management Personnel

191 Other Administrative Personnel

200 Employee Benefits

  • Total Salaries and Benefits as Percent of Revenues: GOSA reports the total salaries and benefits for teachers and paraprofessionals, school administrators, or system-level administrators divided by the grand total of all revenues.
  • Total Salaries and Benefits as Percent of Expenditures: GOSA reports the total salaries and benefits for teachers and paraprofessionals, school administrators, or system-level administrators divided by the grand total of all expenditures.  


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